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Category Archives: Knowledge of God

“Come, let us know, let us pursue the knowledge of God…”

Sovereignty in Cairo

Yes, folks, it’s a new blog post. Pardon the dust, but I hope to be resuming weekly posting again, starting with this entry.

Unless you’re living in a rather hermit-ish cave — in which case I would highly doubt you’d have internet service — you’ve heard of the protests and political instability in Egypt, and hence, in the Middle East as a whole. It’s a very serious situation, with a great deal hanging in the balance. The outcome will affect not just Egypt, but the entire world.

In times like these, speculation is abundant and opinions fly faster and harder than the blizzard that’s slamming the Midwest. Talking heads on news outlets of all sorts are trying to break stories and posit viewpoints for the sake of being able to say, “We told you so, and we told you so first.” Heads of state are, rightly or wrongly, trying to strategically align themselves to influence and benefit from whatever happens. Political factions with big ambitions are trying to turn the chaos into a door of opportunity. The powerful and power-hungry alike are jostling for advantage as a discontented and frustrated group of people are simply trying to make something go well for themselves for a change.

We at the House of Prayer have been praying for Cairo ever since the demonstrations began breaking out. I’ve felt a certain level of uncertainty, and consequently, anxiety in my heart about the situation. I of course don’t know what will happen. I have a small idea of what might happen. Yet I don’t feel like I have a very clear idea of what I think should happen. As my weak little human heart has balked at the scope of it all — things that are clearly much bigger than me and very far out of my control — I’ve felt the Holy Spirit reminding me of a verse, over and over again.

“[The Lord] changes the times and the seasons; He removes kings and raises up kings…” (Daniel 2:21)

Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on February 1, 2011 in Intercession, Knowledge of God

 

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Not to Be Pitied

I was thinking about the Cross the other day, and the incredible severity of what Jesus went through. Of course, there is the physical pain that He endured — the scourging, the blows with a rod, and the slow, agonizing death of crucifixion. There is the interpersonal aspect, from being betrayed to being abandoned and denied. To top it all off, there is the spiritual trauma, both of bearing the world’s sins and of the terrifying interruption of the divine fellowship of the Trinity. No one in the history of creation has endured the kind of suffering that Jesus did.

When we see this — really see it — it is jarring. It can and should deeply impact our emotions. But there is one response it should not elicit in us: pity. Read the rest of this entry »

 

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One Person

In the past few days, I’ve been fascinated to think of Jesus as one Person. At first, that sounds like a pretty inane thing to be fascinated by. After all, everyone else I know is only one person apiece, and that doesn’t strike me as the least bit exciting. However, I’ve been thinking about this as it pertains to Jesus’ incarnation.

In Christology, it can be said that there are four main pillars of truth concerning who Jesus is and what His nature is like. They are:

  1. Jesus is fully God
  2. Jesus is fully Man
  3. Jesus has two distinct natures
  4. Jesus is one, unconfused Person

(In fact, if you’ve been reading this blog for a super long time — and have an exceptional memory — you might notice that we’ve discussed these points before.)

So what is the significance of Jesus being one Person? Why put so much emphasis on something that seems so self-evident? Read the rest of this entry »

 

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Role Modeling Made Easy

Recently, while researching different viewpoints about women in ministry (a subject I have not abandoned, by the way), I ran across a certain preacher who was taking potshots at Wonder Woman. He was decrying her as an invention of the feminist movement, which she is. But he especially took offense at how she acts too much “like a man”. Now, admittedly, I’ve never read the comics, but I would seriously doubt that to be the case. If her costume is any indication, I’d say “butch” is not exactly what the comic creator was going for.

I was discussing this with my mom the other day, and we got to talking about role models for girls in the media. The course of conversation brought up another fictitious fighter, Xena the Warrior Princess (who also received a derogatory mention from the above preacher). She’s another example of the entertainment industry’s attempt to offer girls an alternative role model to delicate wallflowers and fainting damsels in distress such as Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, Rapunzel, and the like.

The secular media loves these superheroes, because when it comes to role models, it means girls no longer have to choose between being a princess and kicking tail.  In the past, in movies and stories, girls have generally been cast in the roles of: cute, boring, basically useless sidekick who gets captured and needs rescuing; delicate, lovely princess who needs rescuing (or at least has the handsome princes falling all over themselves to woo her); or — if she’s useful and has the ability to hold her own — the plain, spunky tomboy who nobody falls in love with but everyone likes to keep around anyway, because she’s just “one of the guys”. The message was fairly clear. Dainty and delicate was the way to go if you wanted to be an attractive, successful woman.

From a purely secular standpoint, Wonder Woman and Xena seem a little refreshing after that kind of stuff. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on December 1, 2009 in Knowledge of God

 

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When Unprofitable Servants are Served

If you read this blog, I imagine you have been keeping up with the awakening meetings taking place at IHOP-KC. If by some remarkable chance you haven’t heard, the Holy Spirit has been moving on us (especially on our student body) in an unusual way lately. You can watch live meetings Wednesday-Sunday, starting at 6pm (Central), as well as watch some amazing archives and testimonies, at www.ihop.org/watch.

You can read the explanation of what is going on at the IHOP website. Plus, you can go read a couple of great posts by Zack Hensley and Randy Bohlender  with some further thoughts on the meetings. As I consider what has already been said, along with what could be said, and how much I’m still trying to get my own bearings on things right now, it is hard to decide how to write about this. At one level, I have to say something — we are having healings, deliverances, and salvations breaking out after all — but at another level, what can I say? (Except for: “Seriously folks, if you haven’t tuned in to any of it yet, get on www.ihop.org/watch sometime this Wed-Sunday.”)

This has something to do with the pronounced lack of blog posts so far this month.

Yet as I was reading through the book of Luke recently, I was struck with two passages that exactly speak to what I’ve been feeling about this season of awakening. Read the rest of this entry »

 

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Jesus is not Braveheart

Here I go, stating the obvious again. I seem to have a knack for doing that in my titles. Certainly nothing will draw readers in like telling them something that everyone and their dog already knows. Assuming that their dogs read or watch movies, that is. And it would also be helpful if they had a basic grasp on theology.

Anyway. The point.

I don’t really take issue with drawing theological parallels to movies. I’ve sat under a number of sermons that referenced a movie, or even played a clip from it, to illustrate a pastor’s point. I’ve seen/heard references to Lord of the Rings (particularly The Return of the King), Gladiator, The Patriot… and even Jurassic Park. No, I’m not kidding about that last one. I wish I could remember what point it was supposed to convey. Probably had something to do with spiritual warfare. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on September 29, 2009 in Knowledge of God

 

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Why I’m Not an Evangelical Feminist

The semantics of this may be mostly relevant to me, but I think the principles are definitely worth some airtime on this blog.

When studying the topic of women in ministry, you instantly run into two big camps of thought. Complementarians believe that, although men and women are equal in their personhood, they are inequal (but complementary) as it pertains to their proper roles in life. Egalitarians believe that men and women are equal in their personhood and are not limited to specific roles/functions. Within these two broad categories, I would technically fall into the second, most particularly as it pertains to ministry.

If you’ve tracked with this blog very long at all, you’ll see that I’ve been doing a study on this subject lately. I’m still at it — albeit slowly — and currently I am studying through a particular complementarian book to try and see both sides of the argument. Now this particular book almost never refers to egalitarians as “egalitarians”. It prefers the term evangelical feminists.

I don’t want to read more into that term than was intended by the authors, but I have to admit it makes me squirm.

Read the rest of this entry »

 
 

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